treez!

DSCF0767-tree man-tweaked-blogIf you guessed the Japanese maple in yesterday’s post is one that I now have in my own yard, you were right. (If you guessed that I planted it myself, well, not so much.  The guys from the nursery planted it, and did a bang up job if it, complete with mulch and fertilizer and chopping out the roots of the old trees with a mattock.)

So from zero trees, after the lingering deaths of our enormous ash trees at the (jaws?) of the dreaded emerald ash borer and their subsequent removal last fall, we are back to three.  None of them are ashes.

In the front yard, we have two young Redpointe maples.  Be patient, they’ll grow.  Admittedly they are not particularly striking right now, just more green neighborhood trees, but that’s the effect we were going for.  There’s something entirely proper about two plain old maple trees in the front yard of a little Midwestern, midcentury ranch house. And they will turn a vivid bright red in the fall. (Yes, Thursday is trash day.)

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And in the backyard, my Japanese maple, a Bloodgood, which is a popular hardy red variety and my personal favorite.  I’ve always wanted a Japanese maple and am ridiculously pleased to have one at last.DSCF0876-japanesemaple-4x3 crop-blog

And just because I can’t leave well enough alone, I got a new shrub too, a gorgeously tattered example of the oak leaf hydrangea “Snow Queen”.  Just wait a while on this one, too– by midsummer it will have big white flowers that age through pinkish to oak brown, and in the fall its leaves will turn all shades of red and bronze.  This type gets pretty huge so if it gets a good start it can go quite a long way.  Yes, the bark is supposed to look like that.

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Special thanks to the very generous anonymous donors who helped make the reforestation of World Headquarters possible.

First round of tree pics taken with the Fuji X-T10/Fujinon 35mm f/1.4.  Film simulation is Pro Neg Standard, which I think gives the most truthful rendering of most plant colors.

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