minicomics ??, post 15: the scribbles begin

Good morning, afternoon, and welcome back to minicomics ??, the liveblogging experiment that combines the production of an actual minicomic with the exciting complications of real life interference and an erratic internet connection.  It’s your online minicomics reality show!

Today it is chilly and damp and the internet is particularly erratic.  But we are pressing on with the first of what I hope will be several posts featuring the scribbles for “Day of the Brontosaurus”.  For those who are new here, a scribble is a kind of large thumbnail of the layout of a page of comics. I prefer to use as few stages as possible between the script and the drawing to preserve a kind of freshness that I think disappears if you draw the same thing over and over trying to polish it and make it perfect.  So, to avoid drawing the page three times (once in layout, once in pencil and once in ink), I try to keep my scribbles as loose as possible.  Still, it’s amazing how often things like facial expressions transfer directly to the finished page.page 1-scribble-blog This is, of course, the cover.  Note that it says “The Day of the Brontosaurus”, but I am so dropping the “The”.  It is stupid.  This is not an exciting cover, but it shows the essential image, and there is actually enough going on with a special effect (the chalk quality of the drawing), a double title (at least one of which is hand drawn), and a fairly high word count for a cover, to justify a very simple composition.

Of particular interest is the note, which I will transcribe for those (meaning everyone but Brian and possibly Wolfie) who cannot read my notehand.

“Need to come up with a size/ratio for the dinosaur drawing.  (we’re going to use it a lot.)  Note that the dinosaurs will be in slightly different positions in every version– like it really is a viewer and they are moving around.

And there it is– that little Kekionga twist that makes this story pop.  Every time we see the dinosaurs in the little 3:2 or 4:3 “viewer screen” in Murphy’s drawing, I want it to seem natural, like the viewer is really doing what Murphy suggests that it does.  Is it?

The process of writing continues through the drawing process.  No script ever survives contact with the scribble.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in minicomics ?? and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to minicomics ??, post 15: the scribbles begin

  1. Rick Santman says:

    And possibly Rick, who, with tons of experience reading his OWN scribbles, managed to clumsy his way through without too much effort.

  2. Pam Bliss says:

    We will add Rick to the list!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s