alligator pears and other kinds of pears and also sparrow grass

Polaroid CUBE Winter drags on and on and photographers are getting desperate enough to shoot with Polaroid Cube toy cameras in the produce department of the butcher shop.  (Not even the grocery store.  Sheesh.)  It’s hardly exploring the farmer’s market with the new 30mm prime, but I guess we will take what we will get.

This meager collection was inspired by the amusing juxtaposition of the Hess avocados and the Forelle pears (guest starring green peppers and plum tomatoes) .  As word lovers know, the avocado is also called the alligator pear, and that name used to be in common use before Americans got comfortable with calling “exotic” foods by “foreign” names.  A few experiences with really good guacamole did a lot to acclimate people.  Consult the Wikipedia for more on the etymology of the word “avocado”: the relationship with the Romance languages’ word for lawyer is mostly a coincidence, and the word “guacamole” itself has impeccable indigenous roots.  And asparagus used to be called “sparrow grass”.Polaroid CUBEI have no idea if $2.99 a pound is a good price, but it looked very pretty.  As did the Brussels sprouts, which is enough to tell you that spring better get here fast.  If Brussels sprouts are starting to look good to me …

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2 Responses to alligator pears and other kinds of pears and also sparrow grass

  1. Rick Santman says:

    Yep. My body has recently grabbed me by the throat, given me a good shake and demanded I start feeding it salad. Big ol green salad, cole slaw, fresh celery with salt or peanut butter, and oranges. Lots of oranges. And lots of salad.

    A good sign indeed that true spring is just around the corner.

  2. Pam Bliss says:

    It’s salad for me, too. I’ve been craving raw greens– baby spinach, dandelion greens, lettuce with weird colors and textures, all with vinegar on it. I think my body is telling me I am eating too much dried mammoth.
    And Easter candy.

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